Category: Review

THE BODYGUARD Provides A Glitzy and Lively Evening of Whitney Houston Classics

THE BODYGUARD Provides A Glitzy and Lively Evening of Whitney Houston Classics

THE BODYGUARD, based on the eponymous film starring Whitney Houston as pop star Rachel Marron and Kevin Costner as her bodyguard Frank Farmer, has plenty of glitz and glamour to go around in its current engagement at Broadway In Chicago’s Oriental Theatre. Throughout the night, lead Deborah Cox shines as Rachel in a never-ending array of glittery costumes from Tim Hatley (who also designed the set). And when Cox tears into one of Houston’s classic numbers, it’s also a joy.

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In Timeline’s A DISAPPEARING NUMBER, Comfort Can Be Found In the Orderly World of Numbers

In Timeline’s A DISAPPEARING NUMBER, Comfort Can Be Found In the Orderly World of Numbers

I had a bit of a revelation after seeing Timeline Theatre Company’s production of A DISAPPEARING NUMBER on Wednesday night. While the immediacy of Complicite’s 2007 play did not strike me immediately upon entering the theater (Timeline’s production is only the fourth staging in the United States), it struck me quite clearly on the journey home. A DISAPPEARING NUMBER spans time and geographical space to follow the narratives of multiple mathematicians—and their loved ones— in their numerical pursuits: the pursuit of patterns and equations, and ultimately, the pursuit of order.

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Enjoyable, Wry MEN ON BOATS Marks American Theater Company Artistic Director Will Davis’s Directorial Debut

Enjoyable, Wry MEN ON BOATS Marks American Theater Company Artistic Director Will Davis’s Directorial Debut

It seems rather poetic that newly appointed Artistic Director Will Davis’s first production at American Theater Company, MEN ON BOATS, focuses rather literally on charting new frontiers. Jaclyn Backhaus’s witty, entertaining play (which Davis previously helmed with a different ensemble off-Broadway) offers a fictionalized account of Major John Wesley Powell’s expedition along the Colorado and Green Rivers towards the then-unknown Grand Canyon. The titular men on boats comprise a crew of ten split among four vessels—and all are played by women or gender non-conforming performers.

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VISITING EDNA Marks An Uneven Journey Between Mother and Son

VISITING EDNA Marks An Uneven Journey Between Mother and Son

Helmed by Steppenwolf Artistic Director Anna D. Shapiro as she launches her first curated season, David Rabe’s world premiere play VISITING EDNA gives audiences a nearly three hour exploration of the relationship between the elderly Edna (Debra Monk), who has terminal cancer, and her middle-aged son Andrew (Ian Barford). And while Rabe clearly wants audiences to grapple with mortality and the joys and challenges of family relationships, the characters—and therefore the play—so often shy away from these issues that are meant to form the heart of VISITING EDNA. Certainly, it is understandable that Edna and Andrew are reluctant to acknowledge Edna’s illness and are also hesitant to dive into some of the thornier parts of their past as mother and son. But despite lovely, honed performances from both Monk and Barford (who does consistently excellent work in everything in which I’ve seen him previously), VISITING EDNA spends so much time in these moments of distraction as to become tiresome.

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Porchlight’s IN THE HEIGHTS Offers An Evening of Musical Delight

Porchlight’s IN THE HEIGHTS Offers An Evening of Musical Delight

Porchlight Music Theatre’s timely production of the 2008 Tony Award-winning musical IN THE HEIGHTS offers audiences the chance to experience this earlier work by HAMILTON creator Lin-Manuel Miranda (with book by Quiara Alegría Hudes) in a fittingly intimate setting as designed with meticulous detail by Greg Pinsoneault. The Latino/a community of New York City’s Washington Heights comes to life under the direction of Brenda Didier (with choreography by Didier and Chris Carter). The ensemble of this HEIGHTS teems with energy and abundant vocal talent (particularly from many of the expert female actors), making this an inviting and enjoyable evening of theater.

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Sharp, Intense TRUE WEST at Shattered Globe

Sharp, Intense TRUE WEST at Shattered Globe

With deft direction by James Yost, Shattered Globe’s production of TRUE WEST made for a solid first Sam Shepard experience for this critic.Kevin Viol and Joseph Wiens have cultivated a convincing and powerful dynamic as estranged brothers Austin and Lee, who are holed up at their mother’s house in the suburbs of Los Angeles. Both actors’ performances ground Shepard’s drama and the uncomfortable rapport between the two siblings they portray provides some intense onstage moments.

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HELLDRIVERS OF DAYTONA Hits Too Many Speed Bumps

HELLDRIVERS OF DAYTONA Hits Too Many Speed Bumps

Chicago, fasten your seat belts—the world premiere musical HELLDRIVERS OF DAYTONA has parked at the Royal George Theatre…and it’s a bumpy, messy ride. Billed as a spoof of 1960s racing films, composer Berton Averre (known for “My Sharona”), lyricist Rob Meurer, and book writer Mark Saltzman have developed a show that’s entirely too on the nose. HELLDRIVERS lacks the satirical tone it seeks; instead, the first act replaces the sexual repression common in those 1960s movies with blatant, unoriginal sexual innuendoes and jokes in poor taste. Though conceived as an ironic take on the movies of that era, HELLDRIVERS feels overall cringe-worthy in the first act. The show shifts gears in the second act to focus more on sending up a number of great American musicals (and one Billy Joel song). The overall experience is erratic.

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KINKY BOOTS Will “Raise You Up” With Its Uplifting, Entertaining Story

KINKY BOOTS Will “Raise You Up” With Its Uplifting, Entertaining Story

Kick up your heels—the 2013 Tony Award-winning musical KINKY BOOTS is back in Chicago for the first time since its pre-Broadway world premiere! This first national tour engagement at Broadway in Chicago’s Oriental Theatre captures much of the vivacity and positive “be yourself” spirit embedded in the show’s script (with music and lyrics by Cyndi Lauper and book by Harvey Fierstein). The current ensemble though has, ahem, rather large shoes to fill, especially in the wake of Billy Porter’s phenomenal Tony-winning turn as drag queen Lola. On the whole, the ensemble infuses this production of KINKY BOOTS with the joy and passion needed to make the musical work (and they execute director/choreographer Jerry Mitchell’s dance moves nicely). Gregg Barnes’s costumes shine brightly as ever for this production, and those titular boots remain literally dazzling. Acclaimed designer David Rockwell’s set is rendered nicely here–the set does not feel lacking in any way.

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Windy City Playhouse’s THIS Muddles in the In-Between

Windy City Playhouse’s THIS Muddles in the In-Between

Both Melissa James Gibson’s play THIS and Windy City Playhouse’s production exist on a precipice. For the characters in Gibson’s script, they stand on the ledge approaching forty and the onset of middle age, while also waxing nostalgic about the good old college days.These college friends—Jane, Marrell, and Alan (plus Marrell’s spouse, Tom, and Jean-Pierre, a new, misplaced member of the circle)—stand firmly in that liminal space. The characters must navigate both the loss of a loved one (Jane is recently widowed) and the creation of new life (Marrell and Tom are parents to a newborn son). And while Gibson’s characters seem to be contemplating major life experiences, she also paints them as exceedingly privileged and self-absorbed—in such a way that it becomes rather difficult to sympathize with them. Similarly, Windy City Playhouse’s production (with direction by Artistic Associate Carl Menninger) occupies an in-between status—partly entertaining (with an occasional laugh-out-loud funny line delivery), partly striving towards deep emotional complexity. Unfortunately, THIS never swings far enough in either direction to be memorable.

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DISENCHANTED! Serves Up Sassy Princess Parody

DISENCHANTED! Serves Up Sassy Princess Parody

The Broadway In Chicago presentation of the musical revue DISENCHANTED! offers a 90-minute spoof of the classic fairy tale princesses, as made famous to most audiences by Walt Disney. With music, lyrics, and book by Dennis T. Giacino and direction by Christopher Bond, DISENCHANTED! provides some fun. That said, the satire stays surface-level—it’s more of a gentle poking than a true skewering of the gender stereotypes deeply embedded within Disney’s tales. DISENCHANTED! presents itself as a pro-feminist musical comedy, but despite some clever moments, the material doesn’t quite reach the level of sophisticated satire. Continue reading “DISENCHANTED! Serves Up Sassy Princess Parody”