Category: Review

Review: PIPELINE at Victory Gardens Theater

Review: PIPELINE at Victory Gardens Theater

In PIPELINE, playwright Dominique Morisseau reflects on the cracks in the inner-city public-school system, and the ways in which it often functions as a school to prison pipeline for young black men, without vilifying the system’s participants. It’s a skillfully crafted balance that demonstrates how the brokenness of the system is disheartening for teachers and students alike. And under the direction of Cheryl Lynn Bruce, Victory Gardens Theater’s ensemble makes this a very human struggle.

Continue reading “Review: PIPELINE at Victory Gardens Theater”

Advertisements
Review: HOW TO CATCH CREATION at Goodman Theatre

Review: HOW TO CATCH CREATION at Goodman Theatre

Christina Anderson’s HOW TO CATCH CREATION, now in its world premiere at Goodman Theatre, uses language that is simultaneously poetic and realistic in its exploration of legacy and artistic expression. The play centers on two generations of characters. We learn that these characters, though living several decades apart, are connected in unexpected ways. And each character longs to establish some kind of legacy, whether it be personal—in the form of children and loved ones—or professional—through works of art that will outlast the creator.

Continue reading “Review: HOW TO CATCH CREATION at Goodman Theatre”

Review: Shattered Globe Theatre/Theater Wit’s THE REALISTIC JONESES

Review: Shattered Globe Theatre/Theater Wit’s THE REALISTIC JONESES

Despite the title, Will Eno’s THE REALISTIC JONESES, now receiving its Chicago premiere in a co-production between Shattered Globe Theatre and Theater Wit, does not seem to wholly exist in the real world. Though Jack Magaw’s tidy set design, Hailey Rakowiecki’s quotidian costume designs, and John Kelly’s lighting design are all quite realistic, Eno’s play dwells in the realm of the absurd. Rather than following any conventional narrative structure, THE REALISTIC JONESES plays out as a series of vignettes between two married couples; both are the Joneses of the title. The elder Joneses, Jennifer and Bob, are long-time residents of the unidentified town near the mountains, while Pony and John are newcomers to the neighborhood.

Continue reading “Review: Shattered Globe Theatre/Theater Wit’s THE REALISTIC JONESES”

Review: DADA WOOF PAPA HOT at About Face Theatre

Review: DADA WOOF PAPA HOT at About Face Theatre

In DADA WOOF PAPA HOT, now in its Chicago premiere at About Face Theatre, playwright Peter Parnell explores that nagging question of what it means to have it all. The play centers on a gay couple and their circle of friends. Though Alan (Bruch Reed) and Rob (Benjamin Sprunger) have been together for fifteen years, they’ve been married for a much shorter period of time and must navigate their shifting identities as partners and as parents of their three-year-old daughter, Nicola. (The play’s seemingly nonsensical title refers to her first words and attempt at her parents’ names.) The characters in DADA WOOF PAPA HOT are clearly well-off, but that doesn’t make the ways in which they struggle with the challenges of daily life and parenthood any less human.

Continue reading “Review: DADA WOOF PAPA HOT at About Face Theatre”

Review: CARDBOARD PIANO at TimeLine Theatre Company

Review: CARDBOARD PIANO at TimeLine Theatre Company

Hansol Jung’s CARDBOARD PIANO, now in its Chicago premiere at Timeline Theatre Company, centers on historical and contemporary issues in Uganda. Jung’s narrative sweeps up much of that nation’s recent history of violence, child soldiers, and homophobia into the story of just a few characters inside a church. And CARDBOARD PIANO relays all this alongside lofty themes of forgiveness, the power of religion, and the human need to fix what’s broken and right wrongs. While this may sound like a tall order for one play to tackle—and it is—it is Jung’s utterly human, multidimensional characters that allow her to find success. Jung also proves a masterful playwright because she knows that the best plays meditate on themes and add more complexity to some of life’s biggest questions, without offering up clear answers.

Continue reading “Review: CARDBOARD PIANO at TimeLine Theatre Company”

Review: ST. NICHOLAS at Goodman Theatre

Review: ST. NICHOLAS at Goodman Theatre

Acclaimed actor Brendan Coyle takes the Goodman stage in Conor McPherson’s thoroughly bizarre monologue play ST. NICHOLAS, which combines the innately unsettling and the supernatural. Coyle, known for his work as Mr. Bates in DOWNTON ABBEY (which this critic has admittedly never seen) proves a master at his craft in this production transferred from London’s Donmar Warehouse.

Continue reading “Review: ST. NICHOLAS at Goodman Theatre”

Review: 110 IN THE SHADE at BoHo Theatre

Review: 110 IN THE SHADE at BoHo Theatre

BoHo Theatre’s production of Harvey Schmidt and Tom Jones’s 110 IN THE SHADE makes the central, fierce, independent female character of Lizzie Curry take center stage. This is particularly true because Neala Barron’s expert performance anchors every moment. Barron mines her character for the maximum amount of meaning and layers she can find: she makes us feel Lizzie’s strong-willed, intelligent presence while also conveying a deep sense of longing to find a husband and start a family. 110 IN THE SHADE strikes a chord precisely because these two facets of Lizzie’s character are not presented as irreconcilable: rather, Lizzie is simultaneously pragmatic and ambitious in her desires. With direction by outgoing Artistic Director Peter Marston Sullivan and music direction by Ellen Morris, Barron also thrives in each musical number backed by a 3-piece orchestra.

Continue reading “Review: 110 IN THE SHADE at BoHo Theatre”

Review: MASTER CLASS at Timeline Theatre Company

Review: MASTER CLASS at Timeline Theatre Company

In Timeline Theatre Company’s MASTER CLASS, Chicago favorite Janet Ulrich Brooks schools the audience with her commanding performance as famous opera singer Maria Callas.

Continue reading “Review: MASTER CLASS at Timeline Theatre Company”

Review: PIPPIN at Mercury Theater’s Venus Cabaret

Review: PIPPIN at Mercury Theater’s Venus Cabaret

Cue the jazz hands—Stephen Schwartz and Roger O. Hirson’s PIPPIN has arrived at Mercury Theater’s Venus Cabaret in an intimate staging that brings the actors and the audience together. Mercury Artistic Director L. Walter Stearns’s interprets this cabaret production of PIPPIN in a literal manner: the show’s visual references and presentational style are highly influenced by the 1920s Weimar cabaret in Germany. Thus, the fictional story of Charlemagne’s son Pippin does not at all take place in medieval times but rather seems to occupy a moment all its own. Given the eccentricities in the material for PIPPIN itself, this is a fitting choice.

Continue reading “Review: PIPPIN at Mercury Theater’s Venus Cabaret”

Review: Firebrand Theatre’s CAROLINE, OR CHANGE

Review: Firebrand Theatre’s CAROLINE, OR CHANGE

Firebrand Theatre’s second season opens with a poignantly fitting musical choice: composer Jeanine Tesori and librettist Tony Kushner’s CAROLINE, OR CHANGE. In the musical from this renowned writing team, protagonist Caroline Thibodeaux, a black woman working as a maid for a white Jewish family in 1963 Lake Charles, Louisiana goes on a powerful journey of self-discovery. Firebrand, in partnership with TimeLine Theatre Company, has made a production choice that fits the company’s feminist mission like a glove.

Continue reading “Review: Firebrand Theatre’s CAROLINE, OR CHANGE”