Category: Rachel’s Picks

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR Electrifies the Stage at Lyric Opera

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR Electrifies the Stage at Lyric Opera

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR ignites the Lyric Opera stage in a never-ending burst of electrifying energy. This production is brilliant from start-to-finish, and it beautifully unites Lyric Opera’s commitment to providing first-rate talent and stunning visuals with director Timothy Sheader’s contemporary, invigorating vision. Originally staged at London’s Regents Park Open Air Theatre in 2016, the Lyric’s production is big and bold in every aspect. Set and costume designer Tom Scutt’s rock concert atmosphere design combines a stark, modern look with a backdrop of lush greenery—a nod to the play’s outdoor theater roots.

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Review: MEMPHIS at Porchlight Music Theatre

Review: MEMPHIS at Porchlight Music Theatre

Hockadoo! Porchlight Music Theatre’s MEMPHIS bursts onto the stage with joy and earnest energy. Under the direction of Daryl Brooks, this musical sheds light on timely historical issues while milking the show’s sweetest, most exuberant moments for all they’re worth. Set in the 1950s, MEMPHIS follows the fictional white DJ Huey Calhoun (based on the real-life DJ Dewey Phillips) as he strives to overcome the city’s racial barriers—and attract radio listeners—by showcasing music from black artists on the radio. Along the way, Huey meets the aspiring young black singer Felicia Farrell. He aims to help Felicia find her place in the spotlight, and of course, also find a spot for him in his heart. Written by Daryl Adams and Joe DiPietro, MEMPHIS does not at all hide the realities of life in Memphis under the laws of Jim Crow. Yet the musical overall treats its subject matter with an optimistic sunniness and places the emphasis on Huey’s attempts to forge racial unity.

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Review: THE MADRES at Teatro Vista

Review: THE MADRES at Teatro Vista

Stephanie Allison Walker’s THE MADRES, now in a Teatro Vista production as part of a rolling world premiere through the National New Play Network, is a gut punch of a play. Set in 1979 Buenos Aires, Argentina, THE MADRES follows three generations of women in a family during La Guerra Sucia (“Dirty War”). Under the Dirty War, the Argentine military went after anyone within the country thought to be subversive or connected to socialism. Those taken hostage became known as Los Desaparecidos (“The Disappeared”). The titular Madres in Walker’s play are the mothers of the disappeared, who would march in front of the Casa Rosada in Buenos Aires to demand the return of their loved ones. Though Walker’s play highlights a moment in Argentina’s history, her portrait of the silencing of voices, the torture of loved ones, and the women who rose up against injustice finds complete alignment with the present moment.

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Review: THE DOPPELGANGER at Steppenwolf Theatre Company

Review: THE DOPPELGANGER at Steppenwolf Theatre Company

Matthew-Lee Erlbach’s THE DOPPELGANGER (AN INTERNATIONAL FARCE), now in its world premiere at Steppenwolf Theatre Company, is a wild, swift-moving, and hilarious ride. As indicated by the numerous doors on Todd Rosenthal’s opulent set, Erlbach’s play employs many of the hallmarks of classic farce. And under the direction of Steppenwolf ensemble member Tina Landau, the production’s first-rate and comically expert cast take Erlbach’s combination of zippy one-liners and absurd physical antics and run (sometimes literally).

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Review: LETTIE at Victory Gardens Theater

Review: LETTIE at Victory Gardens Theater

Boo Killebrew’s world premiere play LETTIE is profoundly heartbreaking and brilliantly conceived. Under the direction of Artistic Director Chay Yew, the production devastatingly unfolds the narrative of the titular working class ex-convict Lettie. Both Killebrew’s masterful, raw writing and Yew’s superlative ensemble—with Caroline Neff in the title role and doing some of the best work so far of her career—bring immense pathos and a swirl of shifting emotions upon the audience.

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Review: WOMEN LAUGHING ALONE WITH SALAD at Theater Wit

Review: WOMEN LAUGHING ALONE WITH SALAD at Theater Wit

Sheila Callaghan’s WOMEN LAUGHING ALONE WITH SALAD, now in a Chicago premiere at Theater Wit, opens with just that: Three women (Echaka Agba, Jennifer Engstrom, and Daniella Pereira) sit on a park bench, eating from large bowls of lettuce in complete silence. The silent salad consumption becomes more intense as the scene continues, but the energy completely changes when Guy (Japhet Balaban) emerges on the scene. Suddenly, all three salad-eating actors become more interested in attracting his attention. In this initial scene, Callaghan launches us into the hilarious and absurd world of her play—a world which director Devon de Mayo’s superlative cast fully embraces.

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THE WOLVES at Goodman Theatre Scores Big

THE WOLVES at Goodman Theatre Scores Big

With her Pulitzer Prize finalist THE WOLVES, young playwright Sarah DeLappe has beautifully, movingly, and realistically captured the tenuousness that comes with being a teenage girl navigating the thorny terrain of high school. DeLappe has captured so precisely the agony and nuances of high school female friendship. In this 90-minute play about an indoor high school girls’ soccer team, DeLappe presents the achingly real challenges of life as a teenage girl in suburban America. While the nine members of the eponymous Wolves are fierce soccer players on the field, these three-dimensional characters have much more to contend with once they step off.

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BREACH at Victory Gardens Theater

BREACH at Victory Gardens Theater

Based on the title alone, Antoinette Nwandu’s “BREACH: a manifesto on race in america through the eyes of a black girl recovering from self-hate” does not sound like a comedy. And yet in BREACH, Nwandu has written a laugh-out-loud satirical piece that also has a real beating heart in its exploration of race and identity in modern-day America. Nwandu’s characters are intentionally broadly drawn and the play has many outsized comedic moments, but BREACH also has humanity running through it.

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Review: MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG at Porchlight Music Theatre

Review: MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG at Porchlight Music Theatre

Porchlight Artistic Director’s intimate staging of Sondheim’s 1981 musical MERRILY WE ROLL ALONG vividly brings to life this piece that chronicles the lives of three close friends as they attempt to gain professional success as artist. While composer Frank Shepard strikes it big as a Hollywood film composer and producer, he leaves his closest friends—lyricist and playwright Charley Kringas and writer Mary Flynn—in the dust. Despite its sunny title, MERRILY is a rather cynical musical about friendship and the revelation that it’s quite lonely at the top. The twist—and one of the main reasons why MERRILY is rarely produced and challenging to stage—is that the musical takes place in reverse chronological order. We see these three “Old Friends” move from jaded success stories back to idealistic hopefuls just starting their careers and forging their tight-knit friendships. MERRILY makes a great deal of sense right now because we are living in mighty cynical times—and watching these central characters contend with the demands of Hollywood has an added sting in this moment.

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Review: ALL MY SONS at Court Theatre

Review: ALL MY SONS at Court Theatre

Court Theatre Artistic Director Charles Newell lends a deft hand to this stunning, newly searing production of Arthur Miller’s ALL MY SONS. Though Miller’s classic play takes place in 1946, the all-star ensemble makes the plight of the crumbling Keller family feel raw and altogether present. From the moment “thunder” comes shattering down on John Culbert’s set as the play begins (lights by Keith Parham and sound by Andre Pluess), ALL MY SONS spirals towards an inevitable tragic end. While this foreboding scene alludes to the darkness to come, Newell’s staging still has a lovely progression in which the tragic moments amount to a larger, all-encompassing gloom.

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